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Money Smart News - April 2004

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To date, the FDIC has delivered over 124,000 copies of Money Smart to financial institutions, community groups, and agencies across the country. More than 100,000 people have taken Money Smart classes; in addition, over 14,000 new banking relationships have been established.

The FDIC has also set up the Money Smart Alliance Program for those organizations wishing to sign an agreement with the FDIC to promote Money Smart throughout their constituency. In many cases, these organizations have a presence in a number of states or nationwide. Since the Money Smart Alliance Program was announced by Chairman Powell in June 2002, the number of Alliance Partners has grown to more than 600.

New Alliance Partners since the January 2004 issue of Money Smart News include:
  • The Iowa Bankers Association
  • National Disability Institute
  • NCB Development Corporation (the nonprofit affiliate of National Cooperative Bank)
All our partners and Alliance members are helping us meet our shared goal of helping low- and moderate-income Americans become "Money Smart" so they can establish healthy banking relationships, begin building assets, and securing a better future for themselves and their families.

We want to hear from you! Please use the form below to tell us your success stories.

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Michael Morris (center), Director of the National Disability Institute, talks with Kevin Curtin (left) and Irene Sellman (right).  Curtin is the FDICís Staff Interpreter for the hearing impaired; Sellman, an FDIC employee who has been deaf since birth, has been teaching Money Smart to deaf classes since last summer.
Michael Morris (center), Director of the National Disability Institute, talks with Kevin Curtin (left) and Irene Sellman (right). Curtin is the FDICís Staff Interpreter for the hearing impaired; Sellman, an FDIC employee who has been deaf since birth, has been teaching Money Smart to deaf classes since last summer.

At the signing of the NDI Partnership Agreement were (from left to right) Chuck Snyder, President and CEO, National Cooperative Bank; Michael Morris, Director, National Disability Institute; Terry Simonette, CEO, NCB Development Corporation; and Donna Gambrell, Deputy Director, FDICís Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection.
At the signing of the NDI Partnership Agreement were (from left to right) Chuck Snyder, President and CEO, National Cooperative Bank; Michael Morris, Director, National Disability Institute; Terry Simonette, CEO, NCB Development Corporation; and Donna Gambrell, Deputy Director, FDICís Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection.


Important: New Requirement for All Grant Funding Applicants
In order to improve the statistical reporting of federal grants and cooperative agreements, the Office of Management and Budget has directed federal agencies to require all applicants to provide a Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number when applying for Federal grants or cooperative agreements on or after October 1, 2003. The DUNS number will be required whether an applicant is submitting a paper or an electronic application, and whether an applicant is applying for a new award or renewal of a current award. While the current directive does not cover non-competing continuations, Phase II of the project, which begins in FY 2004, will cover these continuations. Therefore, we encourage all grantees and potential applicants to obtain a DUNS number.

Use of the DUNS number government-wide will provide a cost-effective means to identify entities receiving those awards and their business relationships. The identifier will be used for tracking purposes, and to validate address and point of contact information. The DUNS number already is in use by the federal government to identify entities receiving federal contracts, and by some agencies in their grant and cooperative agreement processes.

Organizations should verify that they have a DUNS number or take the steps needed to obtain one as soon as possible if there is a possibility that they will be applying for Federal grants or cooperative agreements on or after October 1, 2003. Organizations can receive a DUNS number at no cost by calling the dedicated toll-free DUNS Number request line at 1-866-705-5711. Individuals who would personally receive a grant or cooperative agreement award from the federal government apart from any business or non-profit organization they may operate, and foreign entities are exempt from this requirement.

If your organization does not have a DUNS number, and you anticipate that your organization will apply for a grant or cooperative agreement on or after October 1, 2003, you should take steps to obtain a DUNS number in advance of the application deadline. If your organization does not have a DUNS number, you may not be able to apply for Federal grants or cooperative agreements after that time. Future potential applicants should also consider requesting a DUNS number now if there is any intention of applying for a federal grant in the future.

Further information can be found in the Federal Register, located at: http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2003/pdf/03-16356.pdf - PDF 49k (PDF Help)



Last Updated 10/02/2008 MoneySmartNews@fdic.gov