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Consumer Alert - 2011

E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - December 21, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

While the e-mails exhibit variations in the "From" and "Subject" lines, the messages are similar.

The fraudulent e-mails are said to notify recipients of "recent changes in the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance coverage." They state, "During the period from December 31, 2010 to December 31, 2012 all the money in a "noninterest-bearing transaction account" are fully insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Please note, that this is a temporary measure besides the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's general rules.

The term "noninterest-bearing transaction account" includes a usual checking account or demand deposit account on which no interest is paid by the insured depository institution."

A hyper link is provided (the Web addresses (URL) vary widely) to a Web site that supposedly provides "more details of this temporary FDIC coverage for transaction accounts."

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - December 9, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mails appear to be sent from "alexis.meyers@fdic.gov" and have subject line that reads: "Changes in FDIC security requirements."

The e-mails are addressed to "Dear Client," and state, "Your account ACH and Wire transactions have been temporarily suspended for your Security, due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest Updates, follow this link security." A hyperlink is then provided. They conclude with, "As soon as it is set up, your transaction abilities will be fully restored. Best regards, Online security department, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation"

The following address is provided at the bottom of the message:

"FDIC Public Information Center
3501 North Fairfax Drive, Room E-1002.Section 515. Arlington, VA 22226
Fax Number: (703) 562-2296 Email Address: publicinfo@fdic.gov"

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - December 8, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "insurance@fdic.gov," "subscriptions@fdic.gov," "alert@fdic.gov," or accounts@fdic.gov.

The e-mails have subject lines, such as: "FDIC: Your business account;" "FDIC: About your business account;" "Insurance coverage of your business account;" or something similar.

The e-mails are addressed to "Dear Business Owner," and state, "We have important news regarding your bank." They then ask recipients to "Please click here to find details." They conclude with, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - October 19, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mail appears to be sent from a "Fdic.gov Alert Service [subscriptions@fdic.gov]" e-mail address and has a subject line that reads: "SA-28-2011: Counterfeit Cashier's Checks Alert."

The e-mail states that, "The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has to report that counterfeit cashier's checks bearing the institution's name are in circulation." It further states:

"The counterfeit items display a large variaty of routing numbers, which are assigned to a large number to small and medium size banks all over USA. The items are blue, have rounded corners, and display a security feature statement embedded within a darkened top border. The bank's logo, name, and Web site address appear near the top-left corner of the counterfeit items.

Authentic cashier's checks are yellow and display a security padlock icon at the end of the written dollar amount line. The bank's logo, name, and Web site address are in the top-center area.

Copies of a counterfeit item and an authentic check (VOID) can be seen at https://fdic.gov/starsmail/check.sample.asp for your your review."

The e-mail attempts to trick recipients into clicking on a link directing recipients to a fraudulent Web site.

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - October 11, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mail appears to be sent from a "regulations@fdic.gov" e-mail address and has a subject line that reads: "2011 updated FDIC regulations."

The e-mail starts out by saying "New Regulation approved for the FDI act expected to be implemented untill december 2011." (note: Typographical errors are included). The e-mail attempts to trick recipients into clicking on a link directing recipients to a fraudulent Web site.

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - September 15, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "insurance@fdic.gov," "subscriptions@fdic.gov," "alert@fdic.gov," or accounts@fdic.gov.

The e-mails have subject lines, such as: "FDIC: Your business account;" "FDIC: About your business account;" "Insurance coverage of your business account;" or something similar.

The e-mails are addressed to "Dear Business Owner," and state, "We have important news regarding your bank." They then ask recipients to "Please click here to find details." They conclude with, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - August 30, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent emails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.

The e-mails appear to be sent from a "no.reply@fdic.gov" e-mail address.

The e-mails have a subject line that read: "FDIC Notification."

The fraudulent emails are addressed to "Dear customer" and state "Your account ACH and Wire transactions have been temporarily suspended for security reasons due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest installations read the document(pdf) attached below. As soon as it is set up, your transaction abilities will be fully restored."

The message concludes with, "Best regards, Online security department, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation."

The e-mails include an attachment named "FDIC_document.zip." The e-mails and attachments are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider the intent as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT open the attachment.

Financial institutions and consumers should be aware that other subject lines and modifications to the e-mails may occur over time.  The FDIC does not directly contact consumers in this manner nor does the FDIC request personal financial information from consumers.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - August 17, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mail appears to be sent from "alert@fdic.gov" and includes a subject line that states: "FDIC: Your business account."

The e-mail is addressed to "Dear Business Customer" and states "We have important information about your financial institution. Please click here to find details." It then states, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.

Update:
We have started detecting new, slight variations of the e-mail (highlighted below).

Some e-mails now appear to be sent from our "subscriptions@fdic.gov" e-mail address, as well as our "alert@fdic.gov" e-mail address. Another example has the appearance of coming from "hgrene@fdic.gov" (no such employee exists, I believe).

Some e-mails are addressed to "Dear Business Owner," instead of "Dear Business Customer."

Some e-mails state, "We have important news regarding your bank," instead of "We have important news regarding your financial institution."


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - July 14, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent emails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.

The emails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" email addresses, such as "protection@fdic.gov," "admin@administration.fdic.gov," or "service@admin.fdic.gov."

The messages have various subject lines that read: "Update for your banking account" or "ACH and Wire transfers disabled," and "Banking security update."

The fraudulent emails are addressed to "Dear clients" and state "Your account ACH and Wire transactions have been temporarily suspended for your Security, due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest Updates, follow this link. As soon as it is set up, your transaction abilities will be fully restored."

The message concludes with, "Best regards, Online security department, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation."

These emails and links are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider the intent of these e-mails as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the emails and should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information through this media.

Financial institutions and consumers should be aware that other subject lines and modifications to the e-mails may occur over time. The FDIC does not directly contact consumers in this manner nor does the FDIC request personal financial information from consumers.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - June 3, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mail appears to be sent from "alert@fdic.gov" and includes a subject line that states: "FDIC: Your business account."

The e-mail is addressed to "Dear Business Customer" and states "We have important information about your financial institution. Please click here to find details." It then states, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.

Update:
We have started detecting new, slight variations of the e-mail (highlighted below).

Some e-mails now appear to be sent from our "subscriptions@fdic.gov" e-mail address, as well as our "alert@fdic.gov" e-mail address. Another example has the appearance of coming from "hgrene@fdic.gov" (no such employee exists, I believe).

Some e-mails are addressed to "Dear Business Owner," instead of "Dear Business Customer."

Some e-mails state, "We have important news regarding your bank," instead of "We have important news regarding your financial institution."


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - April 29, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mail appears to be sent from "alert@fdic.gov" and includes a subject line that states: "FDIC: Your business account."

The e-mail is addressed to "Business Owners" and states "We have important information about your bank. Please click here to see information." It then states, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - March 11, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mail appears to be sent from "accounts@fdic.gov" and includes a subject line that states: "About your business account."

The e-mail is addressed to "Business Customers" and states "We have important information about insurance coverage of your business accounts." It then asks recipients to "Please click here to view details" and includes a hyper link to a Web site.

The e-mail says that it is from "Alyssa Williams, FDIC Insurance."

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - February 15, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The subject line of the e-mail states: "Important information for depositors of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation." The e-mail informs recipients that ".this message was sent to you as you had indicated this e-mail address as a contact, by opening an account in your bank department."

The e-mail then states, "In order to inform you about the news concerning current business activity of the Company on a timely basis, please, look through the last important changes in current regulations of endowment insurance procedure. Please, refer to more detailed information in the attached document." The e-mail says that it is from "Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Investor Relations Department."

Attached to the e-mail is Zip file named "FDIC_Document.ZIP"

This e-mail and its attachment are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not open the attachment provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers.


E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC - January 10, 2011

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The subject line of the e-mails state: "Account Insurance from FDIC" or "FDIC Insurance." The e-mail tells recipients that their "account has been denied insurance from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation due to suspected violations of the Patriot Act." The e-mail goes on to ask recipients to "verify through our IDVerify below," stating that ".information will be checked against a federal government database for identity verification." The e-mail says that it is from "Donald E. Powell, Chairman Emeritus FDIC; John D. Hawke, Jr., Comptroller of the Currency; and Michael E. Bartell, Chief Information Officer."

This e-mail and associated Web site are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers and should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers. Financial institutions and consumers should NOT follow the link in the fraudulent e-mail.

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Last Updated 12/26/2012
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