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7500 - FRB Regulations


§ 204.121  Bankers' banks.

(a)(1)  The Federal Reserve Act, as amended by the Monetary Control Act of 1980 (title I of Pub. L. 96--221), imposes Federal reserve requirements on depository institutions that maintain transaction accounts or nonpersonal time deposits. Under section 19(b)(9), however, a depository institution is not required to maintain reserves if it:

(i)  Is organized solely to do business with other financial institutions;

(ii)  Is owned primarily by the financial institutions with which it does business; and

(iii)  Does not do business with the general public.

Depository institutions that satisfy all of these requirements are regarded as "bankers' banks."

(2)  In its application of these requirements to specific institutions, the Board will use the following standards:

(i)  A depository institution may be regarded as organized solely to do business with other depository institutions even if, as an incidental part to its activities, it does business to a limited extent with entities other than depository institutions. The extent to which the institution may do business with other entities and continue to be regarded as a bankers' bank is specified in paragraph (a)(2)(iii) of this section.

(ii)  A depository institution will be regarded as being owned primarily by the institutions with which it does business if 75 percent or more of its capital is owned by other depository institutions. The 75 percent or more ownership rule applies regardless of the type of depository institution.

(iii)  A depository institution will not be regarded as doing business with the general public if it meets two conditions. First, the range of customers with which the institution does business must be limited to depository institutions, including subsidiaries or organizations owned by depository institutions; directors, officers or employees of the same or other depository institutions; individuals whose accounts are acquired at the request of the institution's supervisory authority due to the actual or impending failure of another depository institution; share insurance funds; depository institution trade associations; and such others as the Board may determine on a case-by-case basis consistent with the purposes of the Act and the bankers' bank exemption. Second, the extent to which the depository institution makes loans to, or investments in, the above entities (other than depository institutions) cannot exceed 10 percent of total assets, and the extent to which it receives deposits (or shares if the institution does not receive deposits) from or issues other liabilities to the above entities (other than depository institutions) cannot exceed 10 percent of total liabilities (or net worth if the institution does not receive deposits).

If a depository institution is unable to meet all of these requirements on a continuing basis, it will not be regarded as a bankers' bank and will be required to satisfy federal reserve requirements on all of its transaction accounts and nonpersonal time deposits.

(b)(1)  Section 19(c)(1) of the Federal Reserve Act, as amended by the Monetary Control Act of 1980 (title I of Pub. L. 96-221) provides that federal reserve requirements may be satisfied by the maintenance of vault cash or balances in a Federal Reserve bank. Depository institutions that are not members of the Federal Reserve System may also satisfy reserve requirements by maintaining a balance in another depository institution that maintains required reserve balances at a Federal Reserve bank, in a Federal Home Loan bank, or in the National Credit Union Administration Central Liquidity Facility if the balances maintained by such institutions are subsequently passed through to the Federal Reserve bank.

(2)  On August 27, 1980, the Board announced the procedures that will apply to such pass-through arrangements (45 FR 58099). Section 204.3(i)(1) provides that the Board may permit, on a case-by-case basis, depository institutions that are not themselves required to maintain reserves ("bankers' banks") to act as pass-through correspondents if certain criteria are satisfied. The Board has determined that a bankers' bank may act as a pass-through correspondent if it enters into an agreement with the Federal Reserve to acceptresponsibility for the maintenance of pass-through reserve accounts in accordance with Regulation D (12 CFR 204.3(i)) and if the Federal Reserve is satisfied that the quality of management and financial resources of the institution are adequate in order to enable the institution to serve as a pass-through correspondent in accordance with Regulation D. Satisfaction of these criteria will assure that pass-through arrangements are maintained properly without additional financial risk to the Federal Reserve.

(3)  In order to determine uniformly the adequacy of managerial and financial resources, the Board will consult with the federal supervisor for the type of institution under consideration. Because the Board does not possess direct experience with supervising depository institutions other than commercial banks, and does not intend to involve itself in the direct supervision of such institutions, it will request the National Credit Union Administration to review requests from credit unions that qualify as bankers' banks and the Federal Home Loan Bank Board to review requests from savings and loan associations that qualify as bankers' banks, regardless of charter or insurance status. (The Board, itself, will consider requests from all commercial banks that qualify as bankers' banks.) If the federal supervisor does not find the institution's managerial or financial resources to be adequate, the Board will not permit the institution to act as a pass-through correspondent. In order to assure the continued adequacy of managerial and financial resources, it is anticipated that the appropriate federal supervisor will, on a periodic basis, review and evaluate the managerial and financial resources of the institution in order to determine whether it should continue to be permitted to act as a pass-through correspondent. It is anticipated that, with respect to state chartered institutions, the federal supervisor may discuss the request with the institute state supervisor. The Board believes that this procedure will promote uniformity of treatment for all types of bankers' banks, and provide consistent advice concerning managerial ability and financial strength from supervisory authorities that are in a better position to evaluate these criteria for depository institutions that are not commercial banks.

(4)  Requests for a determination as to whether a depository institution will be regarded as a bankers' bank for purposes of the Federal Reserve Act or for permission to act as a pass-through correspondent may be addressed to the Federal Reserve bank in whose district the main office of the depository institution is located or to the Secretary, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, D.C. 20551. The Board will act promptly on all requests received directly or through Federal Reserve banks.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.121]

[Section 204.121 added at 45 Fed. Reg. 69879, October 22, 1980, effective November 13, 1980; amended at 56 Fed. Reg. 15495, April 17, 1991, effective April 24, 1991; 72 Fed. Reg. 16990, April 6, 2007, effective May 7, 2007]

§ 204.122  Secondary market activities of International Banking Facilities.

(a)  Questions have been raised concerning the extent to which International Banking Facilities may purchase (or sell) IBF-eligible assets such as loans (including loan participations), securities, CDs, and bankers' acceptances from (or to) third parties. Under the Board's regulations, as specified in § 204.8 of Regulation D, IBFs are limited, with respect to making loans and accepting deposits, to dealing only with certain customers, such as other IBFs and foreign offices of other organizations, and with the entity establishing the IBF. In addition, an IBF may extend credit to a nonbank customer only to finance the borrower's non-U.S. operations and may accept deposits from a nonbank customer that are used only to support the depositor's non-U.S. business.

(b)  Consistent with the Board's intent, IBFs may purchase IBF-eligible assets1 from, or sell such assets to, any domestic or foreign customer provided that the transactions are at arm's length without recourse. However, an IBF of a U.S. depository institution may not purchase assets from, or sell such assets to, any U.S. affiliate of the institution establishing the IBF; an IBF of an Edge or Agreement corporation may not purchase assets from, or sell assets to, any U.S. affiliate of the Edge or Agreement corporation or to U.S. branches of the Edge or Agreement corporation or to U.S. branches of the Edge or Agreement corporation other than the branch2 establishing the IBF; and an IBF of a U.S. branch or agency of a foreign bank may not purchase assets from, or sell assets to any U.S. affiliates of the foreign bank or to any other U.S. branch or agency of the same foreign bank.2 (This would not prevent an IBF from purchasing (or selling) assets directly from (or to) any IBF, including an IBF of an affiliate, or to the institution establishing the IBF; such purchases from the institution establishing the IBF would continue to be subject to Eurocurrency reserve requirements except during the initial four-week transition period.) Since repurchase agreements are regarded as loans, transactions involving repurchase agreements are permitted only with customers who are otherwise eligible to deal with IBFs, as specified in Regulation D.

(c)  In the case of purchases of assets, in order to determine that the Board's use-of-proceeds requirement has been met, it is necessary for the IBF (1) to ascertain that the applicable IBF notices and acknowledgments have been provided, or (2) in the case of loans or securities, to review the documentation underlying the loan or security, or accompanying the security (e.g., the prospectus or offering statement), to determine that the proceeds are being used only to finance the obligor's operations outside the U.S., or (3) in the case of loans, to obtain a statement from either the seller or borrower that the proceeds are being used only to finance operations outside the U.S., or in the case of securities, to obtain such

a statement from the obligor, or (4) in the case of bankers' acceptances, to review the underlying documentation to determine that the proceeds are being used only to finance the parties' operations outside the United States.

(d)  Under the Board's regulations, IBFs are not permitted to issue negotiable Euro-CDs, bankers' acceptances, or similar instruments. Accordingly, consistent with the Board's intent in this area, IBFs may sell such instruments issued by third parties that qualify as IBF-eligible assets provided that the IBF, its establishing institution and any affiliate of the institution establishing the IBF do not endorse, accept, or otherwise guarantee the instrument.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.122]

[Section 204.122 added at 46 Fed. Reg. 62812, December 29, 1981, effective December 16, 1981; amended at 52 Fed. Reg. 47694, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.123  Sale of federal funds by investment companies or trusts in which the entire beneficial interest is held exclusively by depository institutions.

(a)  The Federal Reserve Act, as amended by the Monetary Control Act of 1980 (Title I of Pub. L. 96-221) imposes Federal Reserve requirements on transaction accounts and nonpersonal time deposits held by depository institutions. The Board is empowered under the Act to determine what types of obligations shall be deemed a deposit. Regulation D--Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions exempts from the definition of "deposit" those obligations of a depository institution that are issued or undertaken and held for the account of a domestic office of another depository institution (12 CFR 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A)(1)). These exemptions from the definition of "deposit" are known collectively as the "federal funds" or "interbank" exemption.

(b)  Title IV of the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980 authorizes federal savings and loan associations to invest in open-ended management investment companies provided the funds' investment portfolios are limited to the types of investments that a federal savings and loan association could hold without limit as to percentage of assets (12 U.S.C. 1464(c)(1)(Q)). Such investments include mortgages, U.S. government and agency securities, securities of states and political subdivisions, sales of federal funds and deposits held at banks insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The Federal Credit Union Act authorizes federal credit unions to aggregate their funds in trusts provided the trust is limited to such investments that federal credit unions could otherwise make. Such investments include loans to credit union members, obligations of the U.S. government or secured by the U.S. government, loans to other credit unions, shares or accounts held at savings and loan associations or mutual savings banks insured by FSLIC or FDIC, sales of federal funds and shares of any central credit union whose investments are specifically authorized by the board of directors of the federal credit union making the investment (12 U.S.C. 1757(7)).

(c)  The Board has considered whether an investment company or trust whose entire beneficial interest is held by depository institutions, as defined in Regulation D, would be eligible for the federal funds exemption from Reserve requirements and interest rate limitations. The Board has determined that such investment companies or trusts are eligible to participate in the federal funds market because, in effect, they act as mere conduits for the holders of their beneficial interest. To be regarded by the Board as acting as a conduit and, thus, be eligible for participation in the federal funds market, an investment company or trust must meet each of the following conditions:

(1)  The entire beneficial interest in the investment company or trust must be held by depository institutions, as defined in Regulation D. These institutions presently may participate directly in the federal funds market. If the entire beneficial interest in the investment company or trust is held only by depository institutions, the Board will regard the investment company or trust as a mere conduit for the holders of its beneficial interest.

(2)  The assets of the investment company or trust must be limited to investments that all of the holders of the beneficial interest could make directly without limit.

(3)  Holders of the beneficial interest in the investment company or trust must not be allowed to make third party payments from their accounts with the investment company or trust. The Board does not regard an investment company or trust that offers third party payment capabilities or other similiar services which actively transform the nature of the funds passing between the holders of the beneficial interest and the federal funds market as mere conduits. The Board expects that the above conditions will be included in materials filed by an investment company or trust with the appropriate regulatory agencies.

(d)  The Board believes that permitting sales of federal funds by investment companies or trusts whose beneficial interests are held exclusively by depository institutions, that invest solely in assets that the holders of their beneficial interests can otherwise invest in without limit, and do not provide third party payment capabilities offer the potential for an increased yield for thrifts. This is consistent with Congressional intent to provide thrifts with convenient liquidity vehicles.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.123]

[Section 204.123 added at 47 Fed. Reg. 8987, March 3, 1982, effective February 25, 1982; amended at 52 Fed. Reg. 47694, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.124  Repurchase agreement involving shares of a money market mutual fund whose portfolio consists wholly of United States Treasury and federal agency securities.

(a)  The Federal Reserve Act, as amended by the Monetary Control Act of 1980 (Title I of Pub. L. 96-221) imposes federal reserve requirements on transaction accounts and nonpersonal time deposits held by depository institutions. The Board is empowered under the Act to determine what types of obligations shall be deemed a deposit (12 U.S.C. 461). Regulation D--Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions exempts from the definition of "deposit" those obligations of a depository institution that arise from a transfer of direct obligations of, or obligations that are fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States government or any agency thereof that the depository institution is obligated to repurchase (12 CFR 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(B)).

(b)  The National Bank Act provides that a national bank may purchase for its own account investment securities under limitations and restrictions as the Comptroller may prescribe (12 U.S.C. 24, ¶ 7). The statute defines investment securities to mean marketable obligations evidencing indebtedness of any person in the form of bonds, notes, and debentures. The Act further limits a national bank's holdings of any one security to no more than an amount equal to 10 percent of the bank's capital stock and surplus. However, these limitations do not apply to obligations issued by the United States, general obligations of any state and certain obligations of federal agencies. In addition, generally a national bank is not permitted to purchase for its own account stock of any corporation. These restrictions also apply to state member banks (12 U.S.C. 335).

(c)  The Comptroller of the Currency has permitted national banks to purchase for their own accounts shares of open-end investment companies that are purchased and sold at par (i.e., money market mutual funds) provided the portfolios of such companies consist solely of securities that a national bank may purchase directly (Banking Bulletin B-83-58). The Board of Governors has permitted state member banks to purchase, to the extent permitted under applicable state law, shares of money market mutual funds ("MMMF") whose portfolios consist solely of securities that the state member bank may purchase directly (12 CFR 208.123).

(d)  The Board has determined that an obligation arising from a repurchase agreement involving shares of a MMMF whose portfolio consists wholly of securities of the United States government or any agency thereof1 would not be a "deposit" for purposes of Regulations D and Q. The Board believes that a repurchase agreement involving shares of such a MMMF is the functional equivalent of a repurchase agreement directly involving United States government or agency obligations. A purchaser of shares of a MMMF obtains an interest in a pro rata portion of the assets that comprise the MMMF's portfolio. Accordingly, regardless of whether the repurchase agreement involves United States government or agency obligations directly or shares in a MMMF whose portfolio consists entirely of United States government or agency obligations, an equitable and undivided interest in United States and agency government obligations is being transferred. Moreover, the Board believes that this interpretation will further the purpose of the exemption in Regulations D and Q for repurchase agreements involving United States government or federal obligations by enhancing the market for such obligations.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.124]

[Section 204.124 added at 50 Fed. Reg. 13011, April 2, 1985, effective June 4, 1985; amended at 52 Fed. Reg. 47695, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.125  Foreign, international, and supranational entities referred to in §§ 204.2(c)(1)(iv)(E) and 204.8(a)(2)(i)(B)(5).

The entities referred to in section 204.2(c)(1)(E) and § 204.8(a)(2)(i)(B)(5) are:

Europe

Bank for International Settlements.

European Atomic Energy Community.

European Coal and Steel Community.

The European Communities.

European Central Bank

European Development Fund.

European Economic Community.

European Free Trade Association.

European Fund.

European Investment Bank.

Latin America

Andean Development Corporation.

Andean Subregional Group.

Caribbean Development Bank.

Caribbean Free Trade Association.

Caribbean Regional Development Agency.

Central American Bank for Economic Integration.

The Central American Institute for Industrial Research and Technology.

Central American Monetary Stabilization Fund.

East Caribbean Common Market.

Latin American Free Trade Association.

Organization for Central American States.

Permanent Secretariat of the Central American General Treaty of Economic Integration.

River Plate Basin Commission.

Africa

African Development Bank.

Banque Centrale des Etats de l'Afrique Equatorial et du Cameroun.

Banque Centrale des Etats d'Afrique del'Ouest.

Conseil de l'Entente.

East African Community.

Organisation Commune Africaine et Malagache.

Organization of African Unity.

Union des Etats de l'Afrique Centrale.

Union Douaniere et Economique de l'Afrique Centrale.

Union Douaniere des Etats de l'Afrique de l'Ouest.

Asia

Asia and Pacific Council.

Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

Bank of Taiwan.

Korea Exchange Bank.

Middle East

Central Treaty Organization.

Regional Cooperation for Development.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.125]

[Section 204.125 (formerly section 217.126) added at 52 Fed. Reg. 47695, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987; amended at 56 Fed. Reg. 15495, April 17, 1991, effective April 24, 1991; 65 Fed. Reg. 12917, March 10, 2000]

§ 204.126  Depository institution participation in "federal funds" market.

(a)  Under § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A), there is an exemption from Regulation D for member bank obligations in nondeposit form to another bank. To assure the effectiveness of the limitations on persons who sell federal funds to depository institutions, Regulation D applies to nondocumentary obligations undertaken by a depository institution to obtain funds for use in its banking business, as well as to documentary obligations. Under § 204.2(a)(1)(vii) of Regulation D, a depository institution's liability under informal arrangements as well as those formally embodied in a document are within the coverage of Regulation D.

(b)  The exemption in § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A) applies to obligations owed by a depository institution to a domestic office of any entity listed in that section (the "exempt institutions"). The "exempt institutions" explicitly include another depository institution, foreign bank, Edge or Agreement corporation, New York Investment (article XII) Company, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, Minbanc Capital Corp., and certain other credit sources. The term "exempt institutions" also includes subsidiaries of depository institutions:

(1)  That engage in businesses in which their parents are authorized to engage; or

(2)  The stock of which by statute is explicitly eligible for purchase by national banks.

(c)  To assure that this exemption for liabilities to exempt institutions is not used as a means by which nondepository institutions may arrange through an exempt institution to "sell" federal funds to a depository institution, obligations within the exemption must be issued to an exempt institution for its own account. In view of this requirement, a depository institution that "purchases" federal funds should ascertain the character (not necessarily the identity) of the actual "seller" in order to justify classification of its liability on the transaction as "federal funds purchased" rather than as a deposit. Any exempt institution that has given general assurance to the purchasing depository institution that sales by it of federal funds ordinarily will be for its own account and thereafter executes such transactions for the account of others, should disclose the nature of the actual lender with respect to each such transaction. If it fails to do so, the depository institution would be deemed by the Board as indirectly violating section 19 of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation D.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. 204.126]

[Section 204.126 (formerly section 217.137) added at 52 Fed. Reg. 47695, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.127  Nondepository participation in "federal funds" market.

(a) The Board has considered whether the use of "interdepository institution loan participations" ("IDLPs") which involve participation by third parties other than depository institutions in federal funds transactions, comes within the exemption from "deposit" classification for certain obligations owed by a depository institution to an institution exempt in § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A) of Regulation D. An IDLP transaction is one through which an institution that has sold federal funds to a depository institution, subsequently "sells" or participates out that obligation to a nondepository third party without notifying the obligated institution.

(b)  The Board's interpretation regarding federal funds transactions (12 C.F.R 204.126) clarified that a depository institutions's liability must be issued to an exempt institution described in § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A) of Regulation D for its own account in order to come within the nondeposit exemption for interdepository liabilities. The Board regards transactions which result in third parties gaining access to the federal funds market as contrary to the exemption contained in § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A) of Regulation D regardless of whether the nondepository institution third party is a party to the initial transaction or thereafter becomes a participant in the transaction through purchase of all or part of the obligation held by the "selling" depository institution.

(c)  The Board regards the notice requirements set out in 12 C.F.R 204.126 as applicable to IDLP-type transactions as described herein so that a depository institution "selling" federal funds must provide to the purchaser--

(1)  Notice of its intention, at the time of the initial transaction, to sell or participate out its loan contract to a nondepository third party, and

(2)  Full and prompt notice whenever it (the "selling" depository institution) subsequently sells or participates out its loan contract to a non-depository third party.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.127]

[Section 204.127 (formerly section 217.138) added at 52 Fed. Reg. 47695, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.128  Deposits at foreign branches guaranteed by domestic office of a depository institution.

(a)  In accepting deposits at branches abroad, some depository institutions may enter into agreements from time to time with depositors that in effect guarantee payment of such deposits in the United States if the foreign branch is precluded from making payment. The question has arisen whether such deposits are subject to Regulation D, and this interpretation is intended as clarification.

(b)  Section 19 of the Federal Reserve Act which establishes reserve requirements does not apply to deposits of a depository institution "payable only at an office thereof located outside of the States of the United States and the District of Columbia" (12 USC 371a; 12 CFR 204.1(c)(5)). The Board rule in 1918 that the requirements of section 19 as to reserves to be carried by member banks do not apply to foreign branches (1918 Fed. Res. Bull. 1123). The Board has also defined the phrase "Any deposit that is payable only at an office located outside the United States," in § 204.2(t) of Regulation D, 12 C.F.R. 204.2(t).

(c)  The Board believes that this exemption from reserve requirements should be limited to deposits in foreign branches as to which the depositor is entitled, under his agreement with the depository institution, to demand payment only outside the United States, regardless of special circumstances. The exemption is intended principally to enable foreign branches of U.S. depository institutions to compete on a more nearly equal basis with banks in foreign countries in accordance with the laws and regulations of those countries. A customer who makes a deposit that is payable solely at a foreign branch of the depository institution assumes whatever risk may exist that the foreign country in which a branch is located might impose restrictions on withdrawals. When payment of a deposit in a foreign branch is guaranteed by a promise of payment at an office in the United States if not paid at the foreign office, the depositor no longer assumes this risk but enjoys substantially the same rights as if the deposit had been made in a U.S. office of the depository institution. To assure the effectiveness of Regulation D and to prevent evasions thereof, the Board considers that such guaranteed foreign-branch deposits must be subject to that regulation.

(d)  Accordingly, a deposit in a foreign branch of a depository institution that is guaranteed by a domestic office is subject to the reserve requirements of Regulation D the same as if the deposit had been made in the domestic office. This interpretation is not designed in any respect to prevent the head office of a U.S. bank from repaying borrowings from, making advances to, or supplying capital funds to its foreign branches, subject to Eurocurrency liability reserve requirements.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.128]

[Section 204.128 (formerly section 217.146) added at 52 Fed. Reg. 47696, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.129  [Removed]

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.129]

[Section 204.129 (formerly section 217.153) added at 52 Fed. Reg. 47696, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987; section 204.129, removed at 57 Fed. Reg. 40598, September 4, 1992]

§ 204.130  Eligibility for NOW accounts.

(a)  Summary.  In response to many requests for rulings, the Board has determined to clarify the types of entities that may maintain NOW accounts at member banks.

(b)  Individuals.(1)  Any individual may maintain a NOW account regardless of the purposes that the funds will serve. Thus, deposits of an individual used in his or her business including a sole proprietor or an individual doing business under a trade name is eligible to maintain a NOW account in the individual's name or in the "DBA" name. However, other entities organized or operated to make a profit such as corporations, partnerships, associations, business trusts, or other organizations may not maintain NOW accounts.

(2)  Pension funds, escrow accounts, security deposits, and other funds held under various agency agreements may also be classified as NOW accounts if the entire beneficial interest is held by individuals or other entities eligible to maintain NOW accounts directly. The Board believes that these accounts are similar in nature to trust accounts and should be accorded identical treatment. Therefore, such funds may be regarded as eligible for classification as NOW accounts.

(c)  Nonprofit organizations.  (1)  A nonprofit organization that is operated primarily for religious, philanthropic, charitable, educational, political or other similar purposes may maintain a NOW account. The Board regards the following kinds of organizations as eligible for NOW accounts under this standard if they are not operated for profit:

(i)  Organizations described in section 501(c)(3) through (13), and (19) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 501(c)(3) through (13) and (19));

(ii)  Political organizations described in section 527 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 527); and

(iii)  Homeowners and condominium owners associations described in section 528 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 528), including housing cooperative associations that perform similar functions.

(2)  All organizations that are operated for profit are not eligible to maintain NOW accounts at depository institutions.

(3)  The following types of organizations described in the cited provisions of the Internal Revenue Code are among those not eligible to maintain NOW accounts:

(i)  Credit unions and other mutual depository institutions described in section 501(c)(14) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 501(c)(14));

(ii)  Mutual insurance companies described in section 501(c)(15) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 501(c)(15));

(iii)  Crop financing organizations described in section 501(c)(16) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 501(c)(16));

(iv)  Organizations created to function as part of a qualified group legal services plan described in section 501(c)(20) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 501(c)(20)); or

(v)  Farmers' cooperatives described in section 521 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. (I.R.C. 1954) section 521).

(d)  Governmental units.  Governmental units are generally eligible to maintain NOW accounts at member banks. NOW accounts may consist of funds in which the entire beneficial interest is held by the United States, any state of the United States, county, municipality, or political subdivision thereof, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, any territory or possession of the United States, or any political subdivision thereof.

(e)  Funds held by a fiduciary.Under current provisions, funds held in a fiduciary capacity (either by an individual fiduciary or by a corporate fiduciary such as a bank trust department or a trustee in bankruptcy), including those awaiting distribution or investment, may be held in the form of NOW accounts if all of the beneficiaries are otherwise eligible to maintain NOW accounts. The Board believes that such a classification should continue since fiduciaries are required to invest even temporarily idle balances to the greatest extent feasible in order to responsibly carry out their fiduciary duties. The availability of NOW accounts provides a convenient vehicle for providing a short-term return on temporarily idle trust funds of beneficiaries eligible to maintain accounts in their own names.

(f)  Grandfather provision.In order to avoid unduly disrupting account relationships, a NOW account established at a member bank on or before August 31, 1981, that represents funds of a nonqualifying entity that previously qualified to maintain a NOW account may continue to be maintained in a NOW account.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.130]

[Section 204.130 (formerly section 217.157) added at 52 Fed. Reg. 47697, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.131  Participation by a depository institution in the secondary market for its own time deposits.

(a)  Background.  In 1982, the Board issued an interpretation concerning the effect of a member bank's purchase of its own time deposits in the secondary market in order to ensure compliance with regulatory restrictions on the payment of interest on time deposits, with the prohibition against payment of interest on demand deposits, and with regulatory requirements designed to distinguish between time deposits and demand deposits for federal reserve requirement purposes (47 FR 37878, Aug. 27, 1982). The interpretation was designed to ensure that the regulatory early withdrawal penalties in Regulation Q used to achieve these three purposes were not evaded through the purchase by a member bank or its affiliate of a time deposit of the member bank prior to the maturity of the deposit.

(b)  Because the expiration of the Depository Institutions Deregulation Act (Title II of Pub. L. 96--221) on April 1, 1986, removed the authority to set interest rate ceilings on deposits, one of the purposes for adopting the interpretation was eliminated. The removal of the authority to set interest rate ceilings on deposits required the Board to revise the early withdrawal penalties which were also used to distinguish between types of deposits for reserve requirement purposes. Effective April 1, 1986, the Board amended its Regulation D to incorporate early withdrawal penalties applicable to all depository institutions for this purpose (51 FR 9629, Mar. 20, 1986). Although the new early withdrawal penalties differ from the penalties used to enforce interest rate ceilings, secondary market purchases still effectively shorten the maturities of deposits and may be used to evade reserve requirements. This interpretation replaces the prior interpretation and states the application of the new early withdrawal penalties to purchases by depository institutions and their affiliates of the depository institution's time deposits. The interpretation applies only to situations in which the Board's regulatory penalties apply.

(c)  Secondary market purchases under the rule.  The Board has determined that a depository institution purchasing a time deposit it has issued should be regarded as having paid the time deposit prior to maturity. The effect of the transaction is that the depository institution has cancelled a liability as opposed to having acquired an asset for its portfolio. Thus, the depository institution is required to impose any early withdrawal penalty required by Regulation D on the party from whom it purchases the instrument by deducting the amount of the penalty from the purchase price. The Board recognizes, however, that secondary market sales of time deposits are often done without regard to the identity of the original owner of the deposit. Such sales typically involve a pool of time price based on the aggregate face value and average rate of return on the deposits. A depository institution purchasing time deposits from persons other than the person to whom the deposit was originally issued should be aware of the parties named on each of the deposits it is purchasing but through failure to inspect the deposits prior to the purchase may not be aware at the time it purchases a pool of time deposits that it originally issued one or more of the deposits in the pool. In such cases, if a purchasing depository institution does not wish to assess an applicable early withdrawal penalty, the deposit may be sold immediately in the secondary market as an alternative to imposing the early withdrawal penalty.

(d)  Purchases by affiliates.  On a consolidated basis, if an affiliate (as defined in § 204.2(q) of Regulation D) of a depository institution purchases a CD issued by the depository institution, the purchase does not reduce their consolidated liabilities and could be accomplished primarily to assist the depository institution in avoiding the requirements of the Board's Regulation D. Because the effect of the early withdrawal penalty rule could be easily circumvented by purchases of time deposits by affiliates, such purchases are also regarded as an early withdrawals of the time deposit, and the purchase should be treated as if the depository institution made the purchase directly. Thus, the regulatory requirements for early withdrawal penalties apply to affiliates of a depository institution as well as to the institution itself.

(e)  Depository institution acting as broker.  The Board believes that it is permissible for a depository institution to facilitate the secondary market for its own time deposits by finding a purchaser for a time deposit that a customer is trying to sell. In such instances, the depository institution will not be paying out any of its own funds, and the depositor does not have a guarantee that the depository institution will actually be able to find a buyer.

(f)  Third-party market-makers.  A depository institution may also establish and advertise arrangements whereby an unaffiliated third party agrees in advance to purchase time deposits issued by the institution. The Board would not regard these transactions as inconsistent with the purposes that the early withdrawal penalty is intended to serve unless a depository institution pays a fee to the third party purchaser as compensation for making the purchases or to remove the risk from purchasing the deposits. In this regard, any interim financing provided to such a third party by a depository institution in connection with the institution's secondary market activity involving the institution's time deposits must be made substantially on the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the same time for comparable transactions with other similarly situated persons and may not involve more than the normal risk of repayment.

(g)  Reciprocal arrangements.  Finally, while a depository institution may enter into an arrangement with an unaffiliated third party wherein the third party agrees to stand ready to purchase time deposits held by the depository institution's customers, the Board will regard a reciprocal arrangement with another depository institution for purchase of each other's time deposits as a circumvention of the early withdrawal penalty rule and the purposes it is designed to serve.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.131]

[Section 204.131 (formerly section 217.159) added at 52 Fed. Reg. 47697, December 16, 1987, effective December 31, 1987]

§ 204.132 Treatment of Loan Strip Participations.

(a) Effective March 31, 1988, the glossary section of the instructions for the Report of Condition and Income (FFIEC 031--034; OMB No. 7100--0036; available from a depository institution's primary federal regulator) ("Call Report") was amended to clarify that certain short-term loan participation arrangements (sometimes known or styled as "loan strips" or "strip participations") are regarded as borrowings rather than sales for Call Report purposes in certain circumstances. Through this interpretation, the Board is clarifying that such transactions should be treated as deposits for purposes of Regulation D.

(b) These transactions involve the sale (or placement) of a short-term loan by a depository institution that has been made under a long-term commitment of the depository institution to advance funds. For example, a 90-day loan made under a five-year revolving line of credit may be sold to or placed with a third party by the depository institution originating the loan. The depository institution originating the loan is obligated to renew the 90-day note itself (by advancing funds to its customer at the end of the 90-day period) in the event the original participant does not wish to renew the credit. Since, under these arrangements, the depository institution is obligated to make another loan at the end of 90 days (absent any event of default on the part of the borrower), the depository institution selling the loan or participation in effect must buy back the loan or participation at the maturity of the 90-day loan sold to or funded by the purchaser at the option of the purchaser. Accordingly, these transactions bear the essential characteristics of a repurchase agreement and, therefore, are reportable and reservable under Regulation D.

(c) Because many of these transactions give rise to deposit liabilities in the form of promissory notes, acknowledgements of advance or similar obligations (written or oral) as described in § 204.2(a)(1)(vii) of Regulation D, the exemptions from the definition of "deposit" incorporated in that section may apply to the liability incurred by a depository institution when it offers or originates a loan strip facility. Thus, for example, loan strips sold to domestic offices of other depository institutions are exempt from Regulation D under § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A)(1) because they are obligations issued or undertaken and held for the account of a U.S. office of another depository institution. Similarly, some of these transactions result in Eurocurrency liabilities and are reportable and reservable as such.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.132]

[Section 204.132 added at 53 Fed. Reg. 24931, July 1, 1988, effective June 29, 1988]

§ 204.133 Multiple savings deposits treated as a transaction account.

(a)Authority. Under section 19(a) of the Federal Reserve Act, the Board is authorized to define the terms used in section 19, and to prescribe regulations to implement and prevent evasions of the requirements of that section. Section 19(b) establishes general reserve requirements on transaction accounts and nonpersonal time deposits. Under section 19(b)(1)(F), the Board also is authorized to determine, by regulation or order, that an account or deposit is a transaction account if such account is used directly or indirectly for the purpose of making payments to third persons or others. This interpretation is adopted under these authorities.

(b)Background. Under Regulation D, 12 CFR 204.2(d)(2), the term "savings deposit" includes a deposit or an account that meets the requirements of § 204.2(d)(1) and from which, under the terms of the deposit contract or by practice of the depository institution, the depositor is permitted or authorized to make up to six transfers or withdrawals per month or statement cycle of at least four weeks. The depository institution may authorize up to three of these six transfers to be made by check, draft, debit card, or similar order drawn by the depositor and payable to third parties. If more than six transfers (or more than three third party transfers by check, etc.) are permitted or authorized per month or statement cycle, the depository institution may not classify the account as a savings deposit. If the depositor, during the period, makes more than six transfers or withdrawals (or more then three third party transfers by check, etc.), the depository institution may, depending upon the facts and circumstances, be required by Regulation D (Footnote 5 at § 204.2(d)(2)) to reclassify or close the account.

(c)Use of multiple savings deposits. Depository institutions have asked for guidance as to when a depositor may maintain more than one savings deposit and be permitted to make all the transfers or withdrawals authorized for savings deposits under Regulation D from each savings deposit. The Board has determined that, if a depository institution suggests or otherwise promotes the establishment of or operation of multiple savings accounts with transfer capabilities in order to permit transfers and withdrawals in excess of those permitted by Regulation D for an individual savings account, the accounts generally should be considered to be transaction accounts. This determination applies regardless of whether the deposits have entirely separate account numbers or are subsidiary accounts of a master deposit account. Multiple savings accounts, however, should not be considered to be transaction accounts if there is a legitimate purpose, other than increasing the number of transfers or withdrawals, for opening more than one savings deposit.

(d)Examples. The distinction between appropriate and inappropriate uses of multiple accounts is illustrated by the following examples:

Example 1.  (i)  X wishes to open an account that maximizes his interest earnings but also permits X to draw up to ten checks a month against the account. X's Bank suggests an arrangement under which X establishes four savings deposits at Bank. Under the arrangement, X deposits funds in the first account and then draws three checks against that account. X then instructs Bank to transfer all funds in excess of the amount of the three checks to the second account and draws an additional three checks. Funds are continually shifted between accounts when additional checks are drawn so that no more than three checks are drawn against each account each month.

(ii)  Suggesting the use of four savings accounts in the name of X in this example is designed solely to permit the customer to exceed the transfer limitations on savings accounts. Accordingly, the savings accounts should be classified as transaction accounts.

Example 2.(i)  X is trustee of separate trusts for each of his four children. X's Bank suggests that X, as trustee, open a savings deposit in a depository institution for each of his four children in order to ensure an independent accounting of the funds held by each trust.

(ii)  X's Bank's suggestion to use four savings deposits in the name of X in this example is appropriate, and the third party transfers from one account should not be considered in determining whether the transfer and withdrawal limit was exceeded on any other account. X established a legitimate purpose, the segregation of the trust assets, for each account separate from the need to make third party transfers. Furthermore, there is no indication, such as by the direct or indirect transfer of funds from one account to another, that the accounts are being used for any purpose other than to make transfers to the appropriate trust.

Example 3.(i)  X opens four savings accounts with Bank. X regularly draws up to three checks against each account and transfers funds between the accounts in order to ensure that the checks on the separate accounts are covered. X's Bank did not suggest or otherwise promote the arrangement.

(ii)  X's Bank may treat the multiple accounts as savings deposits for Regulation D purposes, even if it discovers that X is using the accounts to increase the transfer limits applicable to savings accounts because X's Bank did not suggest or otherwise promote the establishment of or operation of the arrangement.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.133]

[Section 204.133 added at 57 Fed. Reg. 38427, August 25, 1992, effective September 29, 1992]

§ 204.134 Linked time deposits and transaction accounts.

(a)Authority. Under section 19(a) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 461(a)), the Board is authorized to define the terms used in section 19, and to prescribe regulations to implement and prevent evasions of the requirements of that section. Section 19(b)(2) establishes general reserve requirements on transaction accounts and nonpersonal time deposits. Under section 19(b)(1)(F), the Board also is authorized to determine, by regulation or order, that an account or deposit is a transaction account if such account is used directly or indirectly for the purpose of making payments to third persons or others. This interpretation is adopted under these authorities.

(b)Linked time deposits and transaction accounts. Some depository institutions are offering or proposing to offer account arrangements under which a group of participating depositors maintain transaction accounts and time deposits with a depository institution in an arrangement under which each depositor may draw checks up to the aggregate amount held by that depositor in these accounts. Under this account arrangement, at the end of the day funds over a specified balance in each depositor's transaction account are swept from the transaction account into a commingled time deposit. A separate time deposit is opened on each business day with the balance of deposits received that day, as well as the proceeds of any time deposit that has matured that day that are not used to pay checks or withdrawals from the transaction accounts. The time deposits, which generally have maturities of seven days, are staggered so that one or more time deposits mature each business day. Funds are apportioned among the various time deposits in a manner calculated to minimize the possibility that the funds available on any given day would be insufficient to pay all items presented.

(1)  The time deposits involved in such an arrangement may be held directly by the depositor or indirectly through a trust or other arrangement. The individual depositor's interest in time deposits may be identifiable, with an agreement by the depositors that balances held in the arrangement may be used to pay checks drawn by other depositors participating in the arrangement, or the depositor may have an undivided interest in a series of time deposits.

(2)  Each day funds from the maturing time deposits are available to pay checks or other charges to the depositor's transaction account. The depository institution's decision concerning whether to pay checks drawn on an individual depositor's transaction account is based on the aggregate amount of funds that the depositor has invested in the arrangement, including any amount that may be invested in unmatured time deposits. Only if checks drawn by all participants in the arrangement exceed the total balance of funds available that day (i.e. funds from the time deposit that has matured that day as well as any deposits made to participating accounts during the day) is a time deposit withdrawn prior to maturity so as to incur an early withdrawal penalty. The arrangement may be marketed as providing the customer unlimited access to its funds with a high rate of interest.

(c)Determination. In these arrangements, the aggregate deposit balances of all participants generally vary by a comparatively small amount, allowing the time deposits maturing on any day safely to cover any charges to the depositors' transaction accounts and avoiding any early withdrawal penalties. Thus, this arrangement substitutes time deposit balances for transaction accounts balances with no practical restrictions on the depositors' access to their funds, and serves no business purpose other than to allow the payment of higher interest through the avoidance of reserve requirements. As the time deposits may be used to provide funds indirectly for the purposes of making payments or transfers to third persons, the Board has determined that the time deposits should be considered to be transaction accounts for the purposes of Regulation D.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.134]

[Section 204.134 added at 57 Fed. Reg. 38428, August 25, 1992, effective September 29, 1992]

§ 204.135 Shifting funds between depository institutions to make use of the low reserve tranche.

(a)Authority. Under section 19(a) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 461(a)) the Board is authorized to define terms used in section 19, and to prescribe regulations to implement and to prevent evasions of the requirements of that section. Section 19(b)(2) establishes general reserve requirements on transaction accounts and nonpersonal time deposits. In addition to its authority to define terms under section 19(a), section 19(g) of the Federal Reserve Act also give the Board the specific authority to define terms relating to deductions allowed in reserve computation, including "balances due from other banks." This interpretation is adopted under these authorities.

(b)Background. (1) Currently, the Board requires reserves of zero, three, or ten percent on transaction accounts, depending upon the amount of transaction deposits in the depository institution, and of zero percent on nonpersonal time deposits. In determining its reserve balance under Regulation D, a depository institution may deduct the balances it maintains in another depository institution located in the United States if those balances are subject to immediate withdrawal by the depositing depository institution (§ 204.3(f)). This deduction is commonly known as the "due from" deduction. In addition, Regulation D at § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(A) exempts from the definition of "deposit" any liability of a depository institution on a promissory note or similar obligation that is issued or undertaken and held for the account of an office located in the United States of another depository institution. Transactions falling within this exemption from the definition of "deposit" include federal funds or "fed funds" transactions.

(2)  Under section 19(b)(2) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 461(b)(2)), the Board is required to impose reserves of three percent on total transaction deposits at or below an amount determined under a formula. Transaction deposits falling within this amount are in the "low reserve tranche." Currently the low reserve tranche runs up to $42.2 million. Under section 19(b)(11) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 461(b)(11)) the Board is also required to impose reserves of zero percent on reservable liabilities at or below an amount determined under a formula. Currently that amount is $3.6 million.

(c)Shifting funds between depository institutions. The Board is aware that certain depository institutions with transaction account balances in an amount greater than the low reserve tranche have entered into transactions with affiliated depository institutions that have transaction account balances below the maximum low reserve tranche amount. These transactions are intended to lower the transaction reserves of the larger depository institution and leave the economic position of the smaller depository institutions unaffected, and have no apparent purpose other than to reduce required reserves of the larger institution. The larger depository institution places funds in a demand deposit at a small domestic depository institution. The larger depository institution considers those funds to be subject to the "due from" deduction, and accordingly reduces its transaction reserves in the amount of the demand deposit. The larger depository institution then reduces its transaction account reserves by 10 percent of the deposited amount. The small depository institution, because it is within the low reserve tranche, must maintain transaction account reserves of 3 percent on the funds deposited by the larger depository institution. The small depository institution then transfers all but 3 percent of the funds deposited by the larger depository institution back to the larger depository institution in a transaction that qualifies as a "fed funds" transaction. The 3 percent not transferred to the larger depository institution is the amount of the larger depository institution's deposit that the small depository institution must maintain as transaction account reserves. Because the larger depository institution books this second part of the transaction as a "fed funds" transaction, the larger depository institution does not maintain reserves on the funds that it receives back from the small depository institution. As a consequence, the larger depository institution has available for its use 97 percent of the amount transferred to the small depository institution. Had the larger depository institution not entered into the transaction, it would have maintained transaction account reserves of 10 percent on that amount, and would have had only 90 percent of that amount for use in its business.

(d)Determination. The Board believes that the practice described above generally is a device to evade the reserves imposed by Regulation D. Consequently, the Board has determined that, in the circumstances described above, the larger depository institution depositing funds in the smaller institution may not take a "due from" deduction on account of the funds in the demand deposit account if, and to the extent that, funds flow back to the larger depository institution from the small depository institution by means of a transaction that is exempt from transaction account reserve requirements.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.135]

[Section 204.135 added at 57 Fed. Reg. 38429, August 25, 1992, effective September 29, 1992]

§ 204.136 Treatment of trust overdrafts for reserve requirement reporting purposes.

(a)Authority. Under section 19(a) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 461(a)), the Board is authorized to define the terms used in section 19, and to prescribe regulations to implement and prevent evasions of the requirements of that section. Section 19(b) establishes general reserve requirements on transaction accounts and nonpersonal time deposits. Under section 19(b)(1)(F), the Board also is authorized to determine, by regulation or order, that an account or deposit is a transaction account if such account is used directly or indirectly for the purpose of making payments to third persons or others. This interpretation is adopted under these authorities.

(b)Netting of trust account balances. (1)  Not all depository institutions have treated overdrafts in trust accounts administered by a trust department in the same manner when calculating the balance in a commingled transaction account in the depository institution for the account of the trust department of the institution. In some cases, depository institutions carry the aggregate of the positive balances in the individual trust accounts as the balance on which reserves are computed for the commingled account. In other cases depository institutions net positive balances in some trust accounts against negative balances in other trust accounts, thus reducing the balance in the commingled account and lowering the reserve requirements. Except in limited circumstances, negative balances in individual trust accounts should not be netted against positive balances in other trust accounts when determining the balance in a trust department's commingled transaction account maintained in a depository institution's commercial department. The netting of positive and negative balances has the effect of reducing the aggregate of a commingled transaction account reported by the depository institution to the Federal Reserve and reduces the reserves the institution must hold against transaction accounts under Regulation D. Unless the governing trust agreement or state law authorizes the depository institution, as trustee, to lend money in one trust to another trust, the negative balances in effect, for purposes of Regulation D, represent a loan from the depository institution. Consequently, negative balances in individual trust accounts should not be netted against positive balances in other individual trust accounts, and the balance in any transaction account containing commingled trust balances should reflect positive or zero balances for each individual trust.

(2)  For example, where a trust department engages in securities lending activities for trust accounts, overdrafts might occur because of the trust department's attempt to "normalize" the effects of timing delays between the depository institution's receipt of the cash collateral from the broker and the trust department's posting of the transaction to the lending trust account. When securities are lent from a trust customer to a broker that pledges cash as collateral, the broker usually transfers the cash collateral to the depository institution on the day that the securities are made available. While the institution has the use of the funds from the time of the transfer, the trust department's normal posting procedures may not reflect receipt of the cash collateral by the individual account until the next day. On the day that the loan is terminated, the broker returns the securities to the lending trust account and the trust customer's account is debited for the amount of the cash collateral that is returned by the depository institution to the broker. The trust department, however, often does not liquidate the investment made with the cash collateral until the day after the loan terminates, a delay that normally causes a one day overdraft in the trust account. Regulation D requires that, on the day the loan is terminated, the depository institution regard the negative balance in the customer's account as zero for reserve requirement reporting purposes and not net the overdraft against positive balances in other accounts.

(c)Procedures. In order to meet the requirements of Regulation D, a depository institution must have procedures to determine the aggregate of trust department transaction account balances for Regulation D on a daily basis. The procedures must consider only the positive balances in individual trust accounts without netting negative balances except in those limited circumstances where loans are legally permitted from one trust to another, or where offsetting is permitted pursuant to trust law or written agreement, or where the amount that caused the overdraft is still available in a settlement, suspense or other trust account within the trust department and may be used to offset the overdraft.

[Codified to 12 C.F.R. § 204.136]

[Section 204.136 added at 57 Fed. Reg. 38429, August 25, 1992, effective September 29, 1992]

1 In order for an asset to be eligible to be held by an IBF, the obligor or issuer of the instrument, or in the case of bankers' acceptances, the customer and any endorser or acceptor, must be an IBF-eligible customer. Go back to Text

2 Branches of Edge or Agreement corporations and agencies and branches of foreign banks that file a consolidated report for reserve requirements purposes (FR 2900) are considered to be the establishing entity of an IBF. Go back to Text

1 The term "United States government or any agency thereof" as used herein shall have the same meaning as in § 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(B) of Regulation D, 12 CFR 204.2(a)(1)(vii)(B). Go back to Text


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